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Lodi Gardens

The Lodi period saw the construction of many Mosques and tombs in Delhi, four principle tombs are now within the confines of a park called Lodi Gardens.  The park was initially laid out in 1936 at the behest of Lady Willingdon, wife of the then Viceroy of India.  A small village was situated around the tombs and the people were evicted to enable the park to be created.  It was initially know as Lady Willingdon's Park and this name is still engraved on the stone of some of the entrance ways, but after Independence it was renamed Lodi Gardens.  On the edge of the constructions of New Delhi it does provide a welcome green oasis and is used by many walker, joggers and young couples trying to find some privacy.

The first tomb we saw was that of Muhammad Shah's who died in 1445 and was the third ruler in the Sayyid Dynasty.  The tomb sits on a raised platform and it is the only octagonal tomb in Delhi without a walled compound, though it has quite a grand constructions including an upper level with additional chatri.

 

Shah's Tomb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside the tomb, traditionally the main tomb lies under the centre of the dome, the additional graves will be of other family members.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ceiling of the tomb, which still shows some of its fine decoration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next main building in the garden we saw was the Bara Gumbad or 'Big Dome'.  This is one of three buildings grouped together, as well as this domed structure there is a mosque and a residential building. Its not clear what the building was for, its does not have the features expected of a tomb and there is no evidence of a burial at the site.  It might have been a gateway, but the buildings behind do not merit such a grand structure, and the appear to have been built a few years later.

 

The left hand side of the Bara Gumad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The rear of the Bara Gamud and the mosque is to the right.  An inscription indicates that the mosque was built in 1494.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A section of the fine carvings decorating the wall of the mosque.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This picture was taken standing on the roof of the residential building, the end of the mosque is to the left and the building in the distance is the Sheesh Gumbad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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